2.5 Speaking Assessment

Below are the resources that you will need to work on your 2.5 speaking assessment.

 

The Task

 

The Instructional Video feat. Mrs. Plunkett

The Structure Help

Below are two approaches you could use for the structure of your speech.

Option One 

  • Introduce the overall idea/conflict/issue alongside the text it arises from.
  • Outline perspective one
  • Outline perspective two
  • Compare the two perspectives and express your own ideas/opinions/conclusions

Option Two

  • Introduce the overall idea/conflict/issue alongside the text it arises from.
  • Outline the first “clash zone” in regards to the idea/conflict/issue and present the two perspectives on it.
  • Outline the second ‘clash zone’ in regards to the idea/conflict/issue and present the two perspectives on it.
  • Continue this for as many “clash zones” as you need to.
  • Compare the two perspectives and express your own ideas/opinions/conclusions. You could choose to do this at the end or throughout at speech.

Note: when I am referring to a “clash zone” I mean the key points of the idea/conflict/issue where your two perspectives differ.

 

First or Third Person Perspective

The other decision you have to make about writing and structure is how you will present your “voice” in the speech. You have a couple of options here.

 

First person perspective would explore the perspective from the point of view of a person who holds that perspective. This means, if you were presenting Frankenstein’s perspective, you would be speaking as Frankenstein. Alternatively, if you were presenting on a scientific or moral issue, you could create and adopt a persona to deliver the perspective from. First person uses the words “I” and “We”. You speak as though you ARE the person.

 

Third person perspective would explore the idea with an “outsiders” eye. For example, if you were presenting Frankenstein’s perspective, you would say “Frankenstein believed…” or “John Locke expressed that…”. Third person perspective asks you to report as yourself on the beliefs of another person. This means you would use their names and words such as “he” or “she” or “they”. You speak as YOURSELF looking in on the matter.

The choice is entirely over to you. The first person has roots in monologue and drama, as you are adopting the persona and beliefs of another character or person. The third person can come across as more objective however it really depends on what mood or tone you are aiming for. The first person allows for an intimacy between the perspective and the audience to be developed in a slightly different way to the third person.

To help clarify this further, your essays are written in the third person while the novel Frankenstein is written in the first person.

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by Renee Plunkett

Teacher of English at Mount Aspiring College, Wanaka, New Zealand.

Leave a Reply

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox

Join other followers: